Blog | January 29th, 2019

Common Problems and Issues in Commercial Freezers

Common Problems and Issues in Commercial Freezers

There’s no getting around the issue, even though top-of-the-line commercial freezers come together rapidly to deliver advanced cooling features, they can still fall foul of a nasty system defect. In all likelihood, the problem will have developed elsewhere, and now it’s impacting your expensive coolroom. Let’s get to grips with the problem by identifying and then addressing common commercial freezer issues before they seriously undermine system functionality.

Unique Commercial System Malfunctions

Singularly vexing problems create system damaging gremlins in commercial freezers. Pulling its way through a frosty chamber, a pallet jack or heavy catering trolley is on the move. That’s not an issue that’ll ever trouble a kitchen freezer. Anyway, with its steering mechanism damaged, an out of control catering trolley can pierce an insulated freezer panel or impact a power cable. Flexible conduits solve that latter issue while traffic restricting barriers and rails keep errant traffic contained.

Excessive Chamber Frosting

This could be a dirt related issue. Grime builds up on the condenser coil, an airflow restriction problem develops, and the refrigeration unit pushes hard as it kicks out more freezing cold air. Alternatively, an icy build-up accumulates around the evaporator coil, perhaps due to a refrigerant leak. Importantly, the equipment needs to be taken out of service until the leak is found and sealed. An expert servicing engineer should be notified so that the system can be recharged. In this ice-collecting situation, the best path forward starts with a simple troubleshooting program. Is the thermostat operating properly? Following this logic, the equipment coils are checked for dirt and/or refrigerant leakage issues.

The Hard-To-Itch System Defects

And these next troublemakers really do feel like an itch that can’t be scratched. The energy bill for a commercial freezer is growing every month, but there’s no clear evidence of an energy-siphoning culprit. Maybe a damaged insulating panel is responsible? If that’s not the case, the door mechanism or door seal could be malfunctioning. While one team member looks for door or wall panel damage, the techs return. An energy audit is employed as a leak measuring mechanism.

Most of the problems described above can be remedied by adopting a direct line of system correcting action. If the commercially graded zone’s ducting is dirty, institute a duct cleaning program. For door opening issues, the erring staff members must be instructed to close freezer doors, not to lazily leave them ajar. Better yet, teach the staff to spot obvious signs of damage, such as door gasket damage. Armed with a team of trained trouble spotters, headache-inducing system leaks find it that much harder to hide. Finally, for compressor breakdowns and coil failures, such major system malfunctions must be dealt with before they can cause inventory damage.

Mark Connelly
C&M Coolroom Services
E-mail: markconnelly@cmcoolrooms.com.au
Mobile: 0412 536 315

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